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The Music of Ink at the British Museum

The Music of Ink at the British Museum (ISBN-13 9781872843995), published 17 April 2012 to coincide with China Focus at the London Book Fair, is edited by Helen Wang with contributions by Denis Brown, Rohan de Saram, Romesh Gunesekera, Qu Lei Lei, Yang Lian, Wang Tao and Zeng Laide. Buy this book.

The Music of Ink at the British MuseumAbout the book How are contemporary artists, east and west, conveying and transforming the soul, philosophy and aesthetics of the classical traditions as they create their own work today? How are those traditions being consciously renewed and how do they remain active and alive in the modern world? Which traces of the old ink of centuries past are inspirational still?

‘The Music of Ink’ was a unique and experimental event at the British Museum in June 2005. It brought together well-known contemporary artists from Beijing, Dublin and London: literary artists Yang Lian and Romesh Gunesekera; visual artists Qu Lei Lei and Denis Brown; and performing artists Zeng Laide and Rohan de Saram

The artists were invited to explore the creative links between the classical and the contemporary, both in their own work and with special regard to China. This book will delight readers who are interested in traditional and contemporary art, calligraphy, literature and music. Download Introduction

About the Editor
Helen Wang is Curator of East Asian Money at the British Museum. Her previous books includes Chairman Mao Badges: Symbols and Slogans of the Cultural Revolution (2008), Money on the Silk Road: the Evidence from Eastern Central Asia to cAD 800 (2004) and Sir Aurel Stein in The Times (Saffron, 2002)

moi_cvr400 Table of Contents | Download Table of Contents | Buy

  • ◗ Artists’ Pages
  • ◗ Introduction by Helen Wang
  • ◗ Creative links » Yang Lian
  • ◗ The Bridge of Imagination » Romesh Gunesekera
  • ◗ Contemporary Western Calligraphy: An Artist’s Viewpoint » Denis Brown
  • ◗ Traces of the Heart: The Essence of Poetry, Calligraphy, Painting and Music » Qu Lei Lei
  • ◗ Yang Lian and Romesh Gunesekera in Conversation
  • ◗ Words from Two Visual Artists: A Summary of the Conversation between Denis Brown and Qu Lei Lei
  • ◗ The Music of Ink: Rohan de Saram and Zeng Laide
  • ◗ What The Music of Ink Means to Me » Zeng Laide
  • ◗ The Ink of Music: An Interview with Rohan de Saram
  • ◗ The Music of Ink: Dynamic Thinking in the Chinese Arts » Yang Lian
  • ◗ Tradition and Anti-tradition in Contemporary Chinese Calligraphy » Wang Tao
  • ◗ Index Buy
The Contributors | Download Contributors List
Denis Brown followed a rigorous formal training in traditional calligraphy at the Roehampton Institute, London, studying with Ann Camp. He has since won awards and commissions on four continents, and is internationally recognised as a world leader in the field of letter arts, not only for his traditional calligraphy, but also for his highly original and experimental work in glass and digital art. He was elected as a Fellow of the Society of Scribes and Illuminators (UK) (1988), and Fellow of CLAS, the Calligraphy and Lettering Arts Society (1994). He has also been the recipient of the Golden Web Award (2001-03), Crafts Council of Ireland awards (1989, 1992, 2003), RDS National Crafts Competition prizes (1989-1993, 1997-2000, 2003), the California Gold Medal (1989, 1992), the Boyne Valley National Art Competition (1990), the Philip T Brooks Memorial Prize (1991), the Muriel Gahan Scholarship (1992), the Glass Society of Ireland Award (1998, 2000) and first prize in Letter Arts Review (USA) annual review of 2003.  He was nominated for the Japan Design Foundation, 6th Osaka Design Award (1992), awarded Honorary Membership of the Hong Kong Letter Arts Club (1998) and Honorary Membership of the Alpha Beta Club (ABC) in Hong Kong (2001). www.quillskill.com.
Rohan de Saram studied the cello with Gaspar Cassado, Pablo Casals and John Barbirolli. He has played throughout Europe, Asia, Australia and the former Soviet Union and has worked with many composers, including Kodály, Shostakovich, Poulenc, Walton, Xenakis and Berio. He is also well known through his work in contemporary music (as a member of the Arditti String Quartet), Eastern music, improvised music, and in solo and chamber music recitals with piano as well as other instruments.  His recordings include: Benjamin Britten: Cello Suites no.1–3 (CD: Montaigne MO-782081); Stefano Scodanibbio: My New Address (CD: Stradivarius STR-33668); Karlheinz Stockhausen: Helikopter-Streichquartett (CD: Montaigne MO-782097); Allan Berg: Streichquartett op.3, Lyrische Suite (CD: Montaigne MO-782119); AMM: The Inexhaustible Document (CD: Matchless MR-CD13). www.rohandesaram.co.uk
Romesh Gunesekera is the author of four novels: Reef (1994, Yorkshire Post First Work Prize, 1995; Premio Mondello Five Continents Asia Prize, 1997; shortlisted for the Booker Prize and The Guardian Fiction Prize, 1994), The Sandglass (1998), Heaven’s Edge (2002) and The Match (2006). His first book, Monkfish Moon (1992, a New York Times Notable Book of the Year), was a collection of short stories. He has also received other literary awards, such as the BBC Asia Award for Achievement in Writing and Literature (1998) and several poetry prizes. www.romeshgunesekera.com
Qu Lei Lei 曲磊磊 was a founding member of the Stars Art Movement (1979), the influential group of Chinese artists who fought for greater freedom of expression within the arts after the Cultural Revolution. He came to London in 1985 and has since focused on painting, calligraphy and taichi, all of which he practises and teaches. In 2000 he was awarded the Millenium Adult Tutor Award (National Institute of Adult Continuing Education). He is also Honorary President of the Chinese Brush Painters Society (UK). In 2005 his exhibition Everyone’s Life is an Epic was the first solo exhibition by any Chinese artist at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. His publications include A Visual Diary (1996), Here and Now: to Face a New Century, Exhibition catalogue (1999), Qu Leilei Art Exhibition (2001), The Simple Art of Chinese Calligraphy (2002), The Simple Art of Chinese Brush Painting (2004), The Simple Art of Tai Chi: Step-by-step Fitness and Harmony for Body and Mind (2004) and Chinese Calligraphy: Standard Script for Beginners (2004).
Helen Wang is Curator of East Asian Money in the Department of Coins and Medals at the British Museum. Her publications include Money on the Silk Road: the evidence from Eastern Central Asia to cAD 800 (2004), a number of books on the archaeologist Sir Aurel Stein and his collections – including Handbook to the Stein Collections in the UK (1999), and Sir Aurel Stein in The Times (2002), Metallurgical Analysis of Chinese Coins at the British Museum (2005), articles on East Asian money, and translations of contemporary Chinese literature.
Wang Tao 汪濤 was educated at Yunnan Normal University (Kunming) and the Chinese Academy of Arts Graduate School (Beijing). He came to the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London in 1986, where he completed his PhD – looking at epigraphy and colour symbolism in ancient China. He has been teaching Chinese art and archaeology at SOAS since 1993. He now holds the joint Senior Lectureship shared between SOAS and the Institute of Archaeology, University College London. He has also worked with contemporary Chinese artists in setting up exhibitions and organising seminars.
Yang Lian 楊煉 is one of the young ‘underground’ poets in China, who published the literary magazine Jintian (Today) in the 1980s. He became a poet in exile after the Tian’anmen Massacre in 1989, and has continued to write and speak out as a highly individual voice in world literature, politics and culture. He has published seven selections of poems, two selections of prose and many essays in Chinese. These include In Symmetry with Death (1989), Masks and Crocodiles (1990), The Dead in Exile (1990), Non-Person Singular (1994), Where the Sea Stands Still (1995), Where the Sea Stands Still  – New Poems (1999,  a Poetry Books Society Recommended Translation), Yi (2001), Notes of a Blissful Ghost (2002) and Concentric Circles (2005). He was awarded the Flaiano International Poetry Prize (Italy, 1999). www.yanglian.net
Zeng Laide 曾來德 joined the army in 1973, and was based in northwest China, where he engaged in combat, communications, cultural work and the creative arts. He started to learn calligraphy with the Hu Gongshi, became a Member of the China Calligraphers Association in 1982, and in 1984 came second in China’s ‘First National Wenhui Calligraphy Competition.’ In 1986 he was the subject of the film, The Army’s Inkman, which was translated into English, French, German, Spanish, Russian and Japanese. His first solo exhibitions were in Chengdu (1988) and Beijing (1989). Two touring exhibitions took his work all over China in the 1990s and his exhibition Return to my alma mater was presented at 100 universities in China in 2003-04. In 1999 he established the Laide Arts Centre in Beijing, which serves as his studio and as a centre for artists visiting from around the world. In 2004 he was appointed Professor at Beijing University and also transferred to the Chinese Academy of Painting as a professional calligrapher.

Introduction by Helen Wang

The Music of Ink was part of the programme of events accompanying the exhibition Mountains and Water: Chinese Landscape Painting at the British Museum (February to August, 2005). The programme also included a lecture, ‘Reading Chinese Paintings,’ by Craig Clunas, and a series of gallery talks. These focused on the world of Chinese painting. For The Music of Ink we wanted to do something different: to explore, to experiment, and to try to produce a creative environment in which the participants and audience might experience the excitement and pleasure of discovering something new and unexpected.
The Music of Ink was a unique and experimental one-day event at the British Museum on Saturday 18 June 2005. We brought together six well-known contemporary artists from Beijing, Dublin and London: literary artists Yang Lian and Romesh Gunesekera; visual artists Qu Lei Lei and Denis Brown; and performing artists Zeng Laide and Rohan de Saram. We invited them to explore their work in pairs, in whichever way they chose, and in particular to explore the creative links between the classical and the contemporary, both in their own work and with special regard to China. The title of the event refers specifically to the idea of Chinese characters (zi 字), which form the backbone linking the past and present, offering poetic and visual artists in China endless possibilities for experiment. These characters, in creative writing as well as calligraphy, are traditionally written with a brush in black ink. But how are those Chinese traditions being consciously renewed, and how do they remain active and alive in the fast pace of the modern world? Which traces of the old ink of centuries past remain inspirational? Which music still sings? How do non-Chinese artists react to Chinese characters and writing? What kind of an impact do Chinese characters have on them? On a broader note, how are contemporary artists, east and west, conveying and transforming the soul, philosophy and aesthetics of the classical traditions as they create their own work today?
Yang Lian and Romesh Gunesekera had worked together before on the British Council Writers’ Train Project. Denis Brown and Qu Lei Lei met for the first time on the Friday afternoon. Rohan de Saram and Zeng Laide met for the first time on the Thursday afternoon. Theirs was the most ambitious session of the event as they had agreed to try an experiment: both would perform at the same time, with Rohan playing the cello, and Laide performing calligraphy. It turned out to be quite a task! First, they each needed to get a feel for the venue: for example, the size of the stage and the layout of the auditorium, as well as the particular acoustics of a lecture theatre as opposed to a concert hall. Furthermore, as Rohan does not speak Chinese and Laide does not speak English, communication was either through interpreters or body language. A contradiction emerged almost immediately, when we discovered they had very different needs. For Rohan, time was an essential factor. For Laide, time was almost irrelevant; he wanted space and spontaneity! Laide had sent a box of very large sheets of xuanzhi (mulberry bark paper) made in Anhui province in the 1970s ahead of his arrival in London. Wishing to save this expensive material for the performance, he rehearsed by writing with a dry brush on the dry paper. As he wrote his way vigorously across the stage, Rohan remained seated to one side, generously inviting Laide to select the musical sequences he preferred. Together, we worked out the thinnest threads of timing. As the very short rehearsal time came to an end, our original idea of attaching a microphone to the calligraphy brush – so as to hear the music of ink – simply vanished into thin air. The performance by Rohan and Laide would be the first time they had ever performed together, and it would be an improvisation.
This book is based on The Music of Ink event. The three sessions were recorded, transcribed and edited. In the first session, Yang Lian and Romesh delivered a substantial conversation with a very light touch; there are only minor edits to this transcription. In the second session, Denis and Lei Lei filled the screen with stunnning illustrations, but there were too many to reproduce here and the transcription has been edited quite substantially. It is impossible to recreate a performance of either music or calligraphy, and the transcription of the third session, with Rohan and Laide, although edited very lightly, can be no more than an outline. In addition to the transcriptions, there is also an essay from, or an interview with, each artist after the event. These offer a new dimension to the event. Finally, Wang Tao’s article on recent developments in the world of Chinese calligraphy offers a context in which to consider the calligraphy demonstrated and discussed at The Music of Ink event.
The Music of Ink event was jointly organised with the Chinese Cultural Foundation (London), with assistance from the Great Britain China Centre. I would like to thank them both for their generosity and support. I would also like to offer special thanks to Shao Wei, Yang Lian and Wang Tao for their sustained enthusiasm and assistance, to Shen Ying, who was tireless in his practical help (and, when he finally took a rest late on the Friday night, had to suffer the mischief of London’s urban foxes, who ran off with his shoes), and to Pan Rui, Cheng Qian, Gao Jie and Shao Anding. Colleagues and friends at the British Museum contributed in so many ways, and I am particularly grateful to Andrew Burnett, Joe Cribb, Robert Knox, Elizabeth Errington, Vesta Curtis, Mary Hinton, Kirstin Munro, Louisa Selby, Dan Cowdrill, Chris Power, David Hogan, Valentina Marabini, Kusuma Barnett, Katherine Wilson and Robert Gwynne. Finally, I would like to thank Sajid Rizvi for offering to publish the proceedings and, as always, for keeping his word.

 

Chinese Introduction (thanks to Helen Wang)

《墨乐》思想—艺术项目

 

思想定位

《墨乐》思想—艺术项目由伦敦大英博物馆于二零零五年六月十八日举行。它将由当代著名中、西艺术家参与,配合同时在该馆举行的馆藏中国古代山水画展,完成一次既跨文化、又跨时间的思想交流。

《墨乐》思想—艺术项目的主题是:探索古典与当代之间的创造性联系。这里“古典”具体指的是以汉字(引申为汉字书写和“书画同源”)为根基传承数千年的中 国文化传统。“当代”指的是包含东、西方在内的广义的当代艺术创作——当代中国艺术是这个“当代”整体的有机部分。“创造性联系”,是指在当代思想的激发 下,作为艺术家的个人从不同文化背景出发对古老汉字传统的“再发现”;以及如何通过自己的创作,创造性地转化中国古典绘画、文学、书法中的哲学和美学灵 感。

《墨乐》提出的核心问题是:哪些基因令中国文化传统历久弥新、并仍然能构成对今天世界的思想启示?一如《墨乐》的名称所示:古雅之“墨”,仍在奏出新奇之“乐”!

《墨乐》思想—艺术项目是一场异国情调的文化观光,而是对一个深远古老的文化传统如何不断更新、并主动参与当代世界的思想探讨。

 

形式构思

《墨乐》的形式结构,基于其思想定位,由三个层次的中、西艺术家之间的公开“对话”组成。对话者的座位将在舞台上,而“对话”则不仅在艺术家之间、也将 在艺术家和听众之间进行。参与《墨乐》思想—艺术项目的艺术家是杨炼(诗人) 与 Romesh Gunesekera (作家),曲磊磊(视觉艺术家) 与 Denis Brown (视觉艺术家),曾来德 (书法家) 与Rohan de Saram (音乐家)。

 

在中国报道的消息:

《文艺报:美术专刊》,2005年7月5日

http://news.sina.com.cn/w/2005-06-19/10496984201.shtml

http://news.sina.com.cn/w/2005-06-19/10496984202.shtml

 

Index
¼ tones 82
Admonitions Scroll, The 16, 87, 102, 103
African masks 18, 84
Anhui province 22
An Lushan (703-757) 75
anti-tradition 95, 97, 99, 101, 103, 105, 107, 109, 111, 112, 113, 115
archaeology 18, 110
architecture 29, 87, 95, 109
Arditti Quartet 17, 84, 85
art 17, 18, 34, 82, 92, 95, 97, 106, 109, 112, 113, 114, 115
performance 109
western 39, 100, 107, 108
western – terminology 108
art for art’s sake 79
artists 29, 31, 33, 35, 115
Art of Characters 109
Arts Council England 58, 81
Ashmolean Museum (Oxford) 18, 93
At the Door of the New Millennium: 1979-1999 Chinese Art by Invitation (Beijing, 2000) 109
avant-garde 105, 106, 108, 109
Bach, Johann Sebastian (1685~1750) 67, 68, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 84, 91
48 Preludes and Fugues 82
Choral Preludes 67
The Fall of Adam 67
Bach, Philip Emanuel (1714~1788) 80
Baghavad Gita 79
bamboo 104, 116
Banpo site 55
Barbirolli. Sir John (1899~1970) 17, 81
Barras, Gordon S 113, 114
Bartok, Bela (1881~1945) 82
Beethoven, Ludwig van (1770~1827) 77, 78, 79
Beijing 18, 19, 21, 25, 26, 46, 47, 48, 55, 58, 96, 97, 101, 105, 106, 114
Beihai Park 96
Forbidden City 46, 47
Shisha Hai 47, 48
Temple of Heaven 47
Modern Calligraphy and Paintings Society 97
Bible 67
Bi zhen tu (The Chart of Brush Movement) 96
Blake, William (1757~1827) 84
book 18, 43, 53, 59, 106, 108
Book of Kells 59
British Council 21, 45, 58
British Council Writers’ Train 21, 58
British Museum 18, 21, 22, 24, 69, 73, 87, 90, 91, 94, 95, 98, 99, 100, 101, 103, 109, 113
Brown, Denis 17, 21, 22, 28, 30, 32, 34, 35, 59, 61, 63, 90
Ancient Parchment Riddle 59
Shadows 33, 35
Sweat Drips 33
The Viking Terror 59, 63
txtin iz messin 34
Zen Barcode 9, 32
Brushes with Surprise: The Art of Calligraphy in Modern China (British Museum, 2002) 95, 99, 109
Buddha 80, 85
Buddhism 46, 83, 92
Cage, John 83
calligraphy, 29
Chinese 62, 104
bird script 110
calligraphy-ism 104, 105, 106, 108
clerk script 42, 101
crazy grass script 73
cursive script 31, 100
feibai style 69, 100
grass script 42, 69, 71, 74
magic script 112, 114
Modern Chinese Calligraphy and Painting (study day, British Museum, 1994) 113
modernist calligraphy movement 98, 104, 105, 112
regular script 42, 101, 103
running script 101
seal script 42, 100
Stele School of Calligraphy (Beixue pai) 110
traceology 109
tools – brush 26, 99
as gifts 79
Arabic 31, 54
conceptual calligraphy (workshop, Connecticut, 1999) 32
digital 32
in musical scores 74, 77
Irish 59
Japanese 97
on glass 17
shuimo technique 62
three-dimensional 59, 60, 95
western – formal penmanship 29
western – lettering 17, 33, 35
western – manuscripts and documents 30, 32, 34, 35, 59, 60, 77, 78, 110
western – pen and nib 30, 33
western – picket fence 31, 32
calligraphy tools 34, 59, 61, 74, 75, 95, 110
brush 18, 26, 71, 96, 99, 114
dentist’s drill 60
knives 99, 100, 110
softness 61
xuanzhou inkstone 71
Cao shu ge xing 68, 69, 70, 90
Casals, Pablo (1876~1973) 17, 81
Celtic traditions 59
Chan, Agnes Hung-Chong 51, 58, 93
change 43, 48, 53, 54, 60, 61, 62, 74, 82, 97, 106
Chen Danyan 58
Chinese characters 21, 30, 37, 44, 48, 49, 52, 53, 54, 59, 60, 67, 71, 74, 82, 89, 90, 91, 93, 96, 98, 99, 106, 108, 109, 113, 114
in fashion design 109
Art of Characters 109
invented characters 44, 49, 52, 53, 54, 71, 108
Chinese landscape painting 51, 87
landscape paintings exhibition 61
Chineseness 62, 90
Chinese painting 21, 23, 39, 61, 62, 87, 90, 100
Chinese philosophy 24, 52, 61
Chinese poetry 23, 48, 49, 52, 58
Chinese Writers’ Assocation 58
choice 81, 90
Chongqing 26, 58
Christ 85
Chu Suiliang 97
cinema 19, 32
civilisation 107
Clark, Polly 58
Coleridge, Samuel Taylor (1772~1834) 25, 26, 27
collage 24, 51
commercialism 22, 47, 48, 83
Communism 48
Communist Party of China 48
computers (scans, software, etc) 31, 33, 34, 60
Confucianism 92
Confucius 85
consumerism 27, 47, 56
contradiction 22, 82, 106, 108
Cooper, Arthur 58
Coriolanus 79
Corot, Camille (1796~1875) 62
Cove Park Arts Centre (Scotland) 58
creativity 4, 19, 21, 23, 24, 39, 43, 49, 52, 53, 63, 69, 71, 73, 74, 75, 83, 85, 87, 89, 90, 92, 95, 99, 100, 104, 106, 108
criticism 29, 96, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 112
Cultural Revolution 18, 48, 55, 63, 91, 96, 113, 114
dancers 84
danger 60, 91
Dante (1265~1321) 57, 83, 84, 92
Daoism 39, 61, 62, 63, 71, 91, 92, 93, 110, 112
death 18, 51, 53, 55, 56, 75, 91, 93
design 29, 35, 109,
Debussy, Claude (1862~1918) 84
deciphered 109
Degottex, Jean (1918~1988) 107
Deng Xiaoping (1904~1997) 27
de Saram, Rohan 17, 21, 22, 53, 65, 67, 69, 71, 77, 79, 81, 83, 85, 90
destruction 48, 106
dignity 39, 63
Dong Qichang (1555~1636) 62
dragon 27, 39, 71
drawing 39, 62, 82
Dublin 21
Du Fu (712~770) 23, 49, 58
Du Mu (803~852) 43
Dzungaria Desert 73
East Asian melody 67
Eden 51
Eight Eccentrics of Yangzhou 104
Elderkin, Susan 58
Eliot, T S (1888~1965) 52, 58, 115
emotions/moods 39, 43, 63, 74, 82, 83, 91, 104
anger 42, 83, 92
anguish 90, 91
exhilaration 23, 51
grief 42, 56, 75
English landscapes 62
Er quan ying yue (Reflection of the Moon in the Erquan Springs) 43
Exhibitions 15, 21, 24, 41, 61, 74, 82-83, 87, 91, 97-98, 114, 101, 104-106, 108, 114
Chinese Avant-Garde Art Exhibition (Beijing, 1989) 106
Desire for Words: An Exhibition of Installation Works by Xu Bing and Gu Wenda (Hong Kong, 1992) 114
First Exhibition of Chinese Calligraphy-ism (Zhengzhou, 1993) 104, 105, 106, 108
First Exhibition of Modern Calligraphy (Beijing, 1985) 97, 98, 104, 105
Hua-Mei xiandai shufa zhan (Xiamen, August 1990) 114
installations 15, 24, 41, 114
International Exhibition of Chinese Art (London, 1935-36) 113
Mountains and Water: Chinese Landscape Painting (British Museum, 2005) 21, 61, 87
Shanghai xiandai shufa zhan (Shanghai, November 1991) 114
The Century of Chinese Characters: A Major Exhibition of the Art of Characters (Hanzi shiji: Hanzi yishu dazhan) (Beijing, 2005) 109
The Stars (Beijing, 1979) 96, 101
Xiandai shufa zhan (Hangzhou, 1990) 114
Zhongguo dangdai shufa zhan (Guangzhou, Beijing, 1991) 114
Zhongguo xiandai yishu dazhan (Beijing, February 1989) 114
Zuichu de sige xilie – Qiu Zhenzhong shufa zuopin zhan (Beijing, July 1989) 114
experiment 17, 21, 22, 30, 53, 56, 60, 69, 73, 77, 81, 82, 85, 96, 97, 100, 103, 105, 108, 109, 110, 112
expression 18, 29, 30, 31, 42, 43, 59, 61, 63, 67, 73, 74, 75, 93, 96, 97, 108, 110, 112
fate 63, 93
Fa Xian (c337~c442) 46
fiction 18, 19, 45, 46, 51, 52, 54, 55
fight / struggle 48, 52, 101
fishermen 80
Fong, Wen C 114
food and drink 26, 27, 46, 47, 48, 55, 56, 71, 80, 90
foreign words in Chinese 90
formal penmanship 29
formats – book 18, 22, 24, 46, 49, 51, 53, 55, 56, 59, 96, 106, 108, 109, 113
handscroll 103
Four Modernisations 97, 114
Four Monks 62, 63
Four Wangs, The 62, 63
French Revolution 80
Fry, Roger (1866~1934) 95, 113
Gablik, Suzi 108, 114
Gao shan liu shui (High Mountain, Flowing Water) 43
Gettysburg College 112, 114
giclée printing 28, 30, 34, 35
Giotto (1267~1337) 83
glass 17, 33, 34, 35, 51, 59, 60
God 43, 51, 79, 84
Gold, Mike 35
Gombrich, E H (1909~2001) 114
Gongsun, Madam (8th c) 71
Gong Xian (1619~1689) 62
graffiti 26
Grayson, Charlotte 43
Greeks 79, 80, 83, 87
Green Lake 26, 27
Guangzhou 58, 114
Gu Gan 98, 99, 109
Guilin 114
Gu Kaizhi (c344~c406) 23, 39, 87, 89, 102, 103
Gunesekera, Romesh 18, 21, 22, 27, 45, 47, 49, 51, 53, 55, 56, 57, 58, 89
China Diary 26
Heaven’s Edge 18, 51, 53, 54, 58
Nuburn 53
Reef 18, 45, 46
Stringhoppers 26
Guo Yanping 114
Gu Wenda 114
Hamlet 79
Han-shan 26
Hanart T Z Gallery 114
hands 13, 27, 30, 40, 43, 60, 63, 95, 101
Han dynasty 110
Hangzhou 114
Hawkes, David 58
Haydn, Joseph (1732~1809) 80, 82
Hell 84
Henan province 105
Herbert, W N 47, 58
Holton, Brian 50, 51, 58, 93
home 23, 46
Homer (8th c BC) 48, 80
Hong Kong 17, 46, 58, 61, 114
Hong Kong Arts Centre 114
Hong Ren (1610~1664) 63
honour 37
Horn, Rebecca 24
Moon Mirror 24
Huaisu (8th c) 71
Huang Tingjian (1045~1105) 39, 62
Hu Heqing 114
human 24, 27, 33, 39, 43, 50, 51, 52, 61, 63, 68, 79, 80, 82, 84, 85, 87, 92, 108, 109
Hunan province 71
ideals 43, 48, 106
identity 48, 61
images 114
improvisation 22, 67, 69, 84
India 46
ink 9, 21, 32, 65, 67, 69, 71, 73, 75, 77, 79, 81, 82, 83, 85, 87, 89, 91, 93, 101
inscriptions, Chinese 12, 13, 36, 38, 40, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 108
on bamboo 26, 62, 100, 103, 104, 109, 110, 116
on bone 100, 109, 110
on bronze vessels 100, 109, 110
on metal 33, 109, 110
on silk 39, 46, 71, 91, 102, 109, 110
on stone 91, 109, 110
oracle bone inscriptions 53, 99, 100, 109, 110
study of inscriptions (jinshixue) 110
inspiration 53, 60, 61, 90, 93, 110
International Conference of Lettering Arts 32
interpretation 82, 83, 84
invented characters / language / words 54
invented language (see also Chinese characters – invented characters) 53
Ireland 17, 55, 59
irreversibility 74
Islam 85
Jesus 51, 85
Jiang Kui (1155-1221) 43
Jiang Zhenli 105
Jintian (Today) 18
Ji zhi wen gao (Draft of a funeral oration for Yan Jiming) 75
Klee, Paul (1879~1940) 107
Kodály, Zoltan (1882~1967) 17, 67, 68, 69, 92
Kraus, Richard C 104, 113, 114
Kublai Khan (1215~1294) 25
Kun Can (1612~1673) 63
Kunming 18, 26, 27, 58
Green Lake Park 26, 27
Lanting xu 75
Laozi (6th c BC) 85, 93
layers / layering 29, 33, 34, 51, 53, 59, 60, 61, 62
Ledderose, Lothar 96, 113, 115
legibility (and illegibility) 28, 30, 33, 34, 60, 100, 106, 108, 109, 112
lettering 17, 33, 35
Li Bo (701~762) 23, 68, 69, 70, 71, 90
Li Tang (c100-c1130) 43
literati painting 62
Litt, Toby 58
Liu Gongquan 97
Liu Zongyuan (773~819) 43
Locke, John (1632-1704) 48
London 17, 18, 21, 22, 24, 25, 58, 101, 113, 114, 115
St Paul’s Cathedral 24
lovers 69
Luo Qi 106, 109, 114
Ma Chengxiang 97, 98
Manifesto of Calligraphy-ism 106
Mao Zedong (1893-1976) 48
Marco Polo (c1254-1324) 25, 27, 46
Messian, Olivier (1908-1992) 84
Mi Fu (1051-1107) 39, 62
Milton, John (1608-1674) 48, 84
Ming dynasty 93
misty poetry 51
Misty Poets 48
modernisations 97, 114
Modernism 29, 30, 33, 96
Modernist 33, 96
Mohamed 85
money 18
monkey 80
monks 62, 63
The Four Monks: Zhu Da,Shi Tao, Kun Can, Hong Ren 62, 63
Morrissey, Sinead 58
Mote, F W (1922-2005) 112, 115
mountains 43, 84
Mountains and Water: Chinese Landscape Painting 21
movement 18, 96
Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus (1756-1791) 80
music 3, 4, 7, 9, 21, 32, 65, 67, 69, 71, 73, 75, 77, 79, 81, 82, 83, 85, 87, 89, 91, 93, 101
chamber 17, 81, 82
Chinese (traditional) 43
choral 67
composition 60
experimental 81, 82, 109
harmony 82
improvisation 67
legato 82
melody 42, 67, 74
melody (East Asian) 67
non-tempered tuning 82
notation 57, 67
orchestral 82
soundwaves 31, 32, 33, 60
Sri Lankan 84
stocatto 82
symphony 42
syncopation 32
tones, tonality 73, 81, 82
musical instruments 17
cello 17, 22, 67, 90, 91, 92
drum 31, 84
drum pattern 31
keyboard 81, 82
string instruments 67, 82
violin 67, 78
wind instruments 82
musicians 27, 67, 74, 80, 81
Music of Ink, The 1, 3, 4, 7, 9, 21, 22, 32, 60, 65, 67, 69, 71, 73, 75, 77, 79, 82, 87, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 95, 101
Nanning 105
nature 23, 24, 39, 43, 48, 52, 54, 61, 62, 71
new, newness 17, 18, 19, 21, 22, 24, 26, 27, 29, 30, 33, 42, 43, 46, 47, 48, 49, 52, 54, 55, 56, 58, 60, 62, 71, 73, 75, 78, 80, 81, 84, 85, 89, 90, 92, 93, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 103, 104, 105, 106, 108, 109, 110, 112, 113, 114, 115
New York 18, 53, 115
New Zealand 47
onomatopaeia 49, 56
oracle bone inscriptions 100
Ouyang Xun (557-641) 43, 96, 97
Oxford 18, 58, 81, 93, 113
painting 18, 19, 21, 23, 24, 29, 43, 47, 48, 59, 61, 62, 63, 67, 69, 80, 83, 87, 90, 93, 97, 98, 100, 103, 113, 114
Chinese – bamboo painting 62, 103, 104
Chinese – Chinese landscape painting 51, 87
Chinese – flower painting 100
Chinese – literati painting 39, 42, 62
western 23, 59
western – Expressionism 42
western – landscape 62
western – watercolour 62, 104
oil painting 33, 104
perspective 62, 75, 113
paper 12, 13, 22, 26, 30, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 38, 39, 40, 42, 59, 61, 67, 68, 71, 73, 74, 75, 77, 90, 91, 92, 95, 99, 100, 101, 104, 108, 109, 110, 112, 113
mulberry bark paper 22, 71, 73, 74, 91
Paris 84
passion 34, 67
patterns 15, 24, 31, 33, 41, 51, 60
Peking Opera 97
Peng Shiqian 98
performance 22, 33, 42, 60, 68, 73, 74, 75, 79, 82, 83, 84, 85, 90, 96, 109
personality 23, 35, 77, 96, 108
Petit, Pascale 58
philosophy 24, 39, 52, 61, 93
Photoshop 34
Picasso, Pablo (1881-1973) 83, 84, 96
pleasure 97
poetry 19, 23, 24, 37, 46, 47, 48, 49, 52, 56, 58, 75, 91, 93
images in 33, 47, 51, 52, 58, 63, 74
Misty Poets 48, 51
politics 18, 23, 24, 43, 47, 48, 79, 91, 96, 104, 105, 113, 114
Anti-Bourgeois Liberalism campaign 104
Communism 48
exile 18, 93
Four Modernisations policy 97, 114
official support or sanction 104, 105
socialism 29, 90
Spiritual Pollution 104
Pollock, Jackson (1912-19560 107
Postmodernism 107, 108, 109
Pound, Ezra (1885-1972) 52, 58
printmaking – Chinese 108
woodblock 106
propaganda 48
Pu Lieping 104, 109, 114
Purgatory, Mount 84
Pythagoras (6th c BC) 85
Qi (spirit, energy) 18, 70, 96, 106, 109, 113, 114
Qi Gong (1912-2005) 96, 113, 114
Qin dynasty 110
Qing dynasty 104, 110
Qiu Zhenzhong 109, 114
Qu Lei Lei 18, 21, 22, 59, 61, 63, 87, 90, 91, 93, 101, 104
Andy – A Homeless Man 42
Qu Lei Lei – Creator of Civilization 63
Ely Cathedral 62
Everyone’s life is an epic 90
Future 13, 40
Here and Now – Facing the New Century 12, 18, 38, 43, 63
History 101, 114
Hyde Park Corner 62
Ma Jian – A Writer 42
Melissa – A Victim of 9/11 41, 42
Recollections and Thoughts 13, 40
Tears 36
The Future Remains in our own Hands 13, 40
The Sun in my Dream – the First Half of my Life 39
The Whole of History Appears in Silence 15, 41, 43
Qu Yuan (c340-278 BC) 91, 92, 93
realism 42
Reformation, The 85
religion, popular 112
Renaissance, The 83, 85
repetition 31, 33, 34, 60, 75
rhyme 32, 33, 48, 70, 74
rhythm 33, 60
counter-rhythm 33
monorhythms 60, 61
polyrhythms 31, 32, 33, 60
Rite of Spring 84
Romantic period, The 67
Royal Academy of Music 81
rules 49, 62, 96, 104, 108
sacrifices 47
Schmucker Art Gallery (Gettysburg College) 112
Schönberg, Arnold (1874-1951) 82
Schubert, Franz (1797-1828) 77
science 90, 114
Scottish Arts Council 58
scribes 17
sculpture 82, 95, 109, 113
seals 42, 61, 68, 100, 103
secret codes 112
self 30, 34, 51, 54, 59, 61, 62, 79, 80, 82, 89, 93, 95, 108
shading 39, 82
shadows 34, 35, 56, 60
Shakespeare, William (1564-1616) 79, 80
Shangdu 25
Shang dynasty 99, 110
Shanghai 45, 46, 54, 58, 114
Pudong 46
the Bund 46
Shanghai xiandai shufa zhan 114
Shaoxing 75
Shi-de 26
Shi Lu (1919-1984) 100, 114
Shi Tao (c1638-c1720) 63
Shoujie xinshufa dazhan 114
Sichuan province 93
signature 61
silence 15, 41, 43, 83
silk 18
social change 97, 104, 105, 108, 113
Song dynasty 39, 62
Song period 106
Song style 106
sound 31, 32, 39, 48, 49, 52, 60, 73, 74, 82, 92, 96
sound waves 31, 60
Southampton 85
space 22, 23, 24, 32, 45, 46, 51, 68, 69, 73, 75, 78, 82, 90, 92, 96, 98, 99, 104, 108, 109
spiritual 33, 61, 63, 75, 79, 84, 85, 92, 93, 96, 104
sport 30
Sri Lanka 45, 46, 55, 84, 85
Sri Lankan music 84
Stars, The  96, 101
stones / rocks / pebbles 15, 25, 39, 41, 43, 91, 109, 110
St Paul’s Cathedral 24
Stravinsky, Igor (1882-1971) 82, 84
structure 19, 24, 49, 51, 55, 56, 58, 60, 89, 93
Suggia Award, the 81
Sun Guoting 74
Su Shi (1037-1101) 39, 43, 62
Switzerland 46
sword 27, 61, 71
swordsmanship 60, 61
taijiquan (also known as taiji) 27, 43
talismans 112
Tang dynasty 23, 26, 37, 49, 69, 97, 99, 100, 112
Tang Xiaodu 58
technique 29, 33, 34, 39, 42, 62, 69, 73, 74, 75, 92, 95, 100, 101, 104, 108, 110
technology 31, 32, 61, 75, 80, 82, 85, 97, 108, 114
tension 23, 48, 83
texture 59, 60
theatre 22, 60, 69, 79, 82, 91, 97
theatre – Greek 79, 80, 83, 87
Tian’anmen 18, 39, 47, 63
Tiger 94, 98, 99
time 21, 22, 23, 24, 29, 33, 35, 45, 46, 47, 48, 52, 53, 55, 58, 67, 68, 69, 71, 73, 74, 75, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 90, 91, 92, 93, 96, 97, 106, 109, 110, 114
timing 22, 30, 47, 69, 75, 80, 82, 92
training 17, 37, 80, 81, 84, 95
trains 21, 58
translators / translation 18, 19, 43, 46, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 58, 71, 83, 89, 90, 93, 97, 109, 114
truth 80, 92
Tseng Yuho 114
Two Wangs, the 95, 113
typography 30
UK and China Poets to Poets Translation Project 46, 47, 58
Van Gogh, Vincent (1853-1890) 92
vellum / skin / parchment 51, 59, 79
Vikings 59
Wang, Helen 18, 68
Wang Dongling 94, 98, 99
Wang Hui (1632-1717) 63
Wang Jian (1598-1677) 63
Wang Mansheng 114
Wang Naizhuang 98
Wang Nanming 109
Wangs – The Four Wangs: Wang Shimin, Wang Jian, Wang Yuanqi, Wang Hui 62, 63
Wang Shimin (-1680) 63
Wang Tao 18, 22
Wang Wei (699-761) 43
Wang Xianzhi (c344-386) 95, 113
Wang Xizhi (c303-361) 95, 103, 113
Wang Xuezhong 97
Wang Ying 114
Wang Yuanqi (1642-1715) 63
Wansongpu College (Shandong) 58
war 68
Chu-Han battle 71
warriors 61
Warring States period 110
Wei, Madam (272-349) 96
Wei Ligang 104
Wen Fong 114
Wenyi bao 93
western painting 51, 59
Western Regions (=Xinjiang) 112
western script 60
western vocabulary and terminology 108
women 51, 103, 109
Wordsworth, William (1770-1850) 48
World Literature 26
worship 79
Xanadu 25
Xenakis, Iannis (1922-2001) 17, 82
Xi’an 55, 56
Xiamen 114
Xiandai shufa zhan 114
Xi Chuan 58
Xinjiang 112
Xu Beihong (1895-1953) 39
Xu Bing 106, 108, 109, 112, 114
Xu Futong 98
Xungen – ‘Searching for Roots’ 91
Xu Wei (1521-1593) 91, 92, 93
Yang Lian 18, 21, 22, 24, 45, 46, 49, 51, 54, 58, 70, 71, 79
Coincidental solitude 90
Concentric Circles 19, 24, 49, 51, 55, 56, 58, 89, 93
Darknesses 53
In Symmetry with Death 53
International within the local 54
In the Timeless Air 58
Poetry 56, 93
Rondo and Counterpoint 55, 58
Where the Sea Stands Still 19, 53, 58
Yi 19, 70, 71
Yangtse River (Changjiang) 49
Yangzhou 104
Yan Jiming 75
Yan Sun 114
Yan Zhenqing (709-785) 43, 75, 97
Yen Yuehping 115
Ye Yanbin 58
Yijing (Book of Changes) 43, 53
yin and yang 61
Yuan dynasty 62
Zeng Laide 19, 21, 22, 53, 65, 67, 68, 69, 71, 73, 75, 82, 87, 90, 91, 92, 93, 111, 112, 115
Zhai Yongming 58
Zhang Boying (=Zhang Zhi, 3rd-2nd c BC) 71
Zhang Dawo 104
Zhang Dian (=Zhang Xu, 650s-740s) 71
Zhang Ding 98
Zhang Hongtu 114
Zhang Hua (232-309) 103
Zhang Mei 58
Zhang Qiang 109
Zhang Sengyao (late 5th-mid-6th c) 62
Zhang Wei 58
Zhang Wuyi 115
Zhang Yanyuan (9th c) 100
Zhang Yiwu 115
Zhang Zhe 58
Zhao Mengfu (1254-1322) 96, 100
Zheng Banqiao (1693-1765) 103, 104, 116
Zhengzhou 105
Zhongguo xiandai yishu dazhan 114
Zhou Junjie 106
Zhou Zan 58
Zhu Da (c1626-c1705) 63
Zhu Yisa 114
Zong Bing (375-443) 39

Author: Editor

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